PW: egroj

domingo, 22 de octubre de 2017

Martin Denny ‎• Exotic Percussion



Martin Denny (n. en Nueva York el 10 de abril de 1911 – f. en Honolulu el 2 de marzo de 2005) fue un músico estadounidense, intérprete de piano y compositor, mejor conocido como el "padre de la música exótica". Su trayectoria artística se prolongó hasta la década de 1980, viajó por casi todo el mundo, popularizando su estilo musical el cual estaba enriquecido por percusiones especiales (exóticas, al menos para el escucha norteamericano) y arreglos imaginativos para canciones populares de su época. Dichos temas fueron el inicio de la llamada Cultura Tiki. De las filas de su agrupación surgieron dos geniales instrumentalistas con una acentuada influencia de Denny: Julius Wechter de Baja Marimba Band y el notable percusionista y músico Arthur Lyman.
Bio completa ... https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Denny

///////////////////////////////

Martin Denny (April 10, 1911 ‒ March 2, 2005) was an American piano-player and composer best known as the "father of exotica."[1] In a long career that saw him performing well into the 1980s, he toured the world popularizing his brand of lounge music which included exotic percussion, imaginative rearrangements of popular songs, and original songs that celebrated Tiki culture.
Complete bio ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Denny




Lenny Dee ‎• Golden Organ Memories, vol 1



Martin Taylor • Spirit of Django



Martin Taylor (acoustic guitar); Alec Dankworth (guitar, double bass, percussion); John Goldie (acoustic guitar); Jack Emblow (accordion); Dave O'Higgins (saxophone); James Taylor (drums).


Dave Phillips • The Best Of


Cal Tjader • Sweeter Than Sweetness - Summer Passion



Saffire - The Uppity Blues Women • Cleaning House



VA • Six Million Dollar Groove



Buddy Rich – It’s Crazy (World Pacific)
Wynder K Frog – Jumping Jack Flash (UA)
Bobby Christian – Boogaloo (Ovation)
Roy Meriwether Trio – Jesus Christ Superstar (Notes of Gold)
Moe Koffman – James Brown’s Bag (Jubilee)
Odell Brown & the Organizers – No More Water In the Well (Cadet)
Johnny Lytle – The Snapper (Tuba)
Freddy Robinson – The Coming Atlantis (World Pacific Jazz)
Wilbert Longmire – Scarborough Fair/Canticle (World Pacific Jazz)
Ernie Wilkins Big Band – Funky Broadway (Mainstream)
Little Richie Varola – Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf (Verve)
Freddie McCoy – Beans and Rice (Prestige)
Brother Jack McDuff – I Can’t Be Satisfied (Atlantic)
Jimmy Smith – Sugar Sugar (MGM)
Herbie Mann – Bitch (Atlantic)


Selection by / Compilado por:
http://funky16corners.com/


sábado, 21 de octubre de 2017

Charlie Feathers & Mac Curtis • Rockabilly Kings



Charlie Feathers: Aunque en su momento no fue reconocido, como padre del rockabilly, hay que decir que fue compositor de gran parte de canciones que dieron fama a otros cantantes, entre ellos por ejemplo Elvis Presley.

/////////////////////////////////////////

Mac Curtis: Born in Fort Worth, Texas, Curtis began playing guitar at the age of 12, entering local talent competitions. He moved to Weatherford in 1954, and while there he formed a band with two classmates, Jim and Ken Galbraith. They played at school events, but during one of the events, their show was shut down due to sexually suggestive on-stage movements. Instead, the group played locally, and in 1955 they were offered a deal with King Records, who released their debut single, "If I Had Me a Woman". Soon after Alan Freed heard the group and invited them to play on his Christmas radio special in 1956. He returned to Weatherford to finish school in 1957, and then became a disc jockey in Seoul, Korea after joining the military. Upon his return in 1960, he continued work as a DJ in the South, and released a few albums; his 1968 release, The Sunshine Man, hit #35 on the U.S. Country albums chart. As rockabilly grew in popularity in the 1970s, he began recording with Ray Campi and signed to European label Rollin Rock; his career took off there in the 1980s and 1990s. He was later elected to the Rockabilly Hall of Fame.


Herbie Mann • Opalescence



Ultra-Lounge Vol. 1 • Mondo Exotica



From Amazon:
This is the one Ultra Lounge CD that sees the most play in my CD rotation. It sets the tone for any activity, be it just staring into the trees through my living room window or driving to work on a day when I don't feel well. I always find it hard to critique Ultra Lounge CDs song by song, since I tend to analyze a lounge CD more by its overall feel than by how one particular song makes me react. But this one is really a great place to start the Ultra Lounge collection, partly because it's the first one in the series and partly because it includes some artists that you should get to know independent of the Ultra Lounge compilations: Martin Denny and Les Baxter. These guys really stand out among lounge artists, and their styles are very unique. Overall the collection, for those not familiar with the "exotica" genre, documents lounge's attempt to "go global". This mostly involved lifting themes and ideas from tropical or island music, and the result was a sub-genre that I find delightful! It is more evocative than a lot of other lounge music and is an essential if you own a pool or give a lot of cocktail parties.


jueves, 19 de octubre de 2017

Dick Hyman • The Way You Look Tonight



A very versatile virtuoso, Dick Hyman once recorded an album on which he played "A Child Is Born" in the styles of 11 different pianists, from Scott Joplin to Cecil Taylor. Hyman can clearly play anything he wants to, and since the '70s, he has mostly concentrated on pre-bop swing and stride styles. Hyman worked with Red Norvo (1949-1950) and Benny Goodman (1950), and then spent much of the 1950s and '60s as a studio musician. He appears on the one known sound film of Charlie Parker (Hot House from 1952); recorded honky tonk under pseudonyms; played organ and early synthesizers in addition to piano; was Arthur Godfrey's music director (1959-1962); collaborated with Leonard Feather on some History of Jazz concerts (doubling on clarinet), and even performed rock and free jazz; but all of this was a prelude to his later work. In the 1970s, Hyman played with the New York Jazz Repertory Company, formed the Perfect Jazz Repertory Quintet (1976), and started writing soundtracks for Woody Allen films. He has recorded frequently during the past several decades (sometimes in duets with Ruby Braff) for Concord, Music Masters, and Reference, among other labels, and ranks at the top of the classic jazz field. In 2013, Hyman teamed up with vocalist Heather Masse for a set of standards on the Red House label called Lock My Heart. ~by Scott Yanow


Joe Harriot & John Mayer • Indo-Jazz Suite



Review by Thom Jurek
 In England in the 1960s, Harriott was something of a vanguard wonder on the order of Ornette Coleman. And while the comparisons flew fast and furious and Harriott was denigrated as a result, the two men couldn't have been more different. For one thing, Harriott was never afraid to swing. This work, written and directed by Mayer, offered the closest ever collaboration and uniting of musics East and West. Based almost entirely in the five-note raga -- or tonic scale that Indian classical music emanates from -- and Western modalism, the four ragas that make up the suite are a wonder of tonal invention and modal complexity, and a rapprochement to Western harmony. The band Harriott assembled here included his own group -- pianist Pat Smythe, bassist Coleridge Goode, and drummer Allan Ganley -- as well as trumpeter Kenny Wheeler, flutist Chris Taylor, Diwan Mothar on sitar, Chandrahas Paiganka on tamboura, and Keshan Sathe on tabla, with Mayer playing violin and Harriott on his alto. Of the four pieces, the "Overture" and "Contrasts" are rooted in blues and swing, though they move from one set of ascending and descending notes to the other, always ending on the tonic, and involve more than the five, six, or seven notes of Indian classical music, while the latter two -- "Raga Megha" and "Raga Gaud-Saranga" -- are out to lunch in the Western musical sensibility and throw all notions of Western harmony out the window. The droning place of the tamboura and the improvising sitar and alto shift the scalar notions around until they reflect one another in interval and mode, creating a rich, mysterious tapestry of sonic inquiry that all but folds the two musics into one another for good. Amazing.