egroj world: septiembre 2017
PW: egroj

jueves, 28 de septiembre de 2017

Sam Most • East Coast Jazz



Herbie Mann • The Evolution of Mann-The Herbie Mann Anthology



VA • Great Vibes!



Milt Jackson,  Cal Tjader, Roy Ayers, Terry Gibbs,  Gary Burton,  Eddie Costa, Bobby Hutcherson,  Gary McFarland, Dave Pike,  Lionel Hampton ...


Ultra-Lounge Vol. 12 • Saxophobia



From Amazon:
With the saxophone as the link between these selections, I was a little nervous that the Ultra-Lounge series might have gone too far - but not to worry! From "Samba De Orfeu" by Bill Perkins to a smooth version of "Harlem Nocturne" by Louis Prima & Sam Butera - you have a great collection of Lounge Sax music. Another great addition to a wonderful series!


miércoles, 27 de septiembre de 2017

Harmonica Sam with The Domestic Bumblebees • Rocker No.1



Desde Suecia Harmonica Sam y los Domestic Bumblebees, excelente banda de Rockabilly, Rhythm and blues y Rock and Roll.

///////////////////

From Sweden the Harmonica Sam and Domestic Bumblebees, excellent band of Rockabilly, Rhythm and Blues and Rock and Roll.


Claude Williams • Swing Time In New York



Claude "Fiddler" Williams (February 22, 1908 – April 26, 2004) was an American jazz violinist and guitarist.
Williams was born in Muskogee, Oklahoma, in 1908, and by 10 he had learned to play guitar, mandolin, banjo and cello. Upon hearing Joe Venuti play, he was inspired to take up the violin. In 1928, he moved to Kansas City and toured with Andy Kirk's territory band Twelve Clouds of Joy, which also included Mary Lou Williams, and further honed his musicianship by participating in jam sessions. Count Basie discovered him in Kansas City and later invited him to play rhythm guitar in his band. From the late 1960s, he often played with fellow Kansas City resident Jay McShann. From the 1980s, Williams performed on violin exclusively.
In 1997, Claude Williams was inducted into the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame.
He died of pneumonia in Kansas City at age 96. He was the last surviving jazz musician to have recorded before 1930.
His memorabilia has been donated to the LaBudde Special Collections Department at the Miller Nichols Library at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Full info ...


Review by Scott Yanow
Violinist Claude Williams, at the age of 86, shows that he is still in his musical prime during this quintet date with Bill Easley (who switches between tenor, clarinet and flute), pianist Sir Roland Hanna, bassist Earl May and drummer Joe Ascione. Williams was with both Andy Kirk and Count Basie shortly before they made it big but has spent most of his long career in Kansas City in obscurity. Fortunately he has made several worthy recordings in his later years and this is one of his best, a well-rounded set ranging in repertoire from one of the first songs he ever learned ("You've Got to See Your Mama Ev'ry Night or You Can't See Mama at All") to Ellington, Monk ("Straight No Chaser") and even Stevie Wonder ("You Are the Sunshine of My Life"). The emphasis is on swing and Claude Williams is heard near the peak of his powers.


Jimmy Smith • Sum Serious Blues



Review by Scott Yanow
Organist Jimmy Smith performs a spirited set of blues-based material (only "You've Changed" is a change of pace) with a dozen of his Los Angeles-based friends including trumpeter Oscar Brashear, the underrated tenor Herman Riley (who is best among the supporting cast), guitarist Philip Upchurch and singers Marlena Shaw and Bernard Ighner who have two vocals apiece. Nothing that surprising occurs other than Smith's surprisingly effective vocal on "Hurry Change, If You're Comin'," but the swinging music, which was arranged by Johnny Pate, should please Jimmy Smith's fans.


VA • Acid Jazz Movie & TV Themes



Review by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Acid Jazz Movie and TV Themes contains a number of familiar themes ("Mission: Impossible," "Rollerball, " "Love Boat, " "Top of the Pops, " "Dirty Harry, " "The Flintstones") that have been arranged as acid-jazz songs. Clearly, the album was designed to appeal to the hipper-than-thou audience that celebrates kitsch, not quality, but peel back the ironic layers, and there are some intriguing beats and textures here. There just aren't enough to make it worthwhile to anyone but patient, open-minded listeners.


Ronnie Foster • On The Avenue



Ronnie Foster (12 de mayo de 1950) es un pianista, organista y compositor estadounidense de jazz funk. Info completa...

////////////////////////

Ronnie Foster (born May 12, 1950) is an American funk and soul-jazz organist, and record producer. His albums recorded for Blue Note Records in the 1970s has obtained a cult following after the emergence of acid-jazz. Full info ...


Johnny Dankworth • Five Steps To Dankworth



John Phillip William Dankworth, (20 de septiembre de 1927 – 6 de febrero de 2010), conocido en sus inicios musicales como Johnny Dankworth, fue un compositor de jazz, saxofonista y clarinetista inglés. Info completa ...

//////////////////////////////////

Sir John Phillip William Dankworth, CBE (20 September 1927 – 6 February 2010), known in his early career as Johnny Dankworth, was an English jazz composer, saxophonist and clarinetist. He was the husband of jazz singer Dame Cleo Laine, who survives him; they married in 1958. More info ...


Bradley Leighton • Groove Yard



Review by Alex Henderson
Brazilian jazz doesn't necessarily have to be soft, lyrical, caressing, or gently melodic. The innovative saxophonist Ivo Perelman, for example, has combined Brazilian rhythms with free jazz and has been greatly influenced by Albert Ayler and post-1965 John Coltrane; at times, Perelman can be downright blistering. But in many cases, Brazilian jazz is, in fact, lyrical and gently melodic -- and those words easily describe what Bradley Leighton does on Groove Yard, his first album as a leader. The West Coast flutist doesn't play Brazilian jazz exclusively on this 2003 release; his interpretation of Wes Montgomery's "Road Song," for example, is more Afro-Cuban than Brazilian. But Brazilian songs dominate the 42-minute CD, and they're songs that inspire Leighton to be especially lyrical -- including Ary Barroso's "Bahia," Duduka Da Fonseca's "Doña Maria," and two Antonio Carlos Jobim compositions: "Fotografia" and "Mojave." Leighton, thankfully, isn't one of those jazz musicians who plays warhorses exclusively. When it comes to Brazilian music, some of the lazier jazz artists refuse to do their homework -- they insist on playing nothing but the most beaten-to-death warhorses and are too lazy to unearth the lesser-known gems of prolific composers like Jobim, Ivan Lins, Dori Caymmi, and Milton Nascimento. But Leighton isn't lazy; "Mojave" is one of Jobim's lesser-known songs -- and while "Fotografia" is better known than "Mojave," it hasn't been totally beaten to death the way that "Corcovado," "The Girl from Ipanema," and "One Note Samba" have been beaten to death. As lyrically as Leighton plays on Groove Yard, he still knows how to be funky; soul-jazz is a major inspiration, especially the soul-jazz of Herbie Mann and Hubert Laws (two of his main influences). Leighton isn't a groundbreaking or terribly original player, but he's talented, warm, and expressive -- and those qualities serve him well on this solid, if derivative, outing.




James Taylor Quartet • The Template



martes, 26 de septiembre de 2017

Buddy Cole • Hot And Cole



VA • Swingin' Sounds For Secret Agents



VA • Best Of Jazz Flute



Roland Kirk,  Yusef Lateef,  Dave Valentin,  James Moody, Herbie Mann, Eric Dolphy, Bobbi Humphrey ...


VA • Windy City Bop - Chicago Rockabilly






VA • Moving Between Dimensions



 Frank Wess,  Lonnie Sith,  Lou Donaldson ,  Bobby Hutcherson, Brian Auger and Julie Driscoll ...


Selection by / Compilado por:
http://funky16corners.com/


Dill Jones • Jones the Jazz



Dillwyn Owen Paton Jones, or Dill Jones (19 August 1923 - 22 June 1984), was a Welsh jazz stride pianist.Jones was born in Newcastle Emlyn, Carmarthenshire, on 19 August 1923. He was brought up in New Quay on the Cardiganshire coast. Music was in the family as his mother was a pianist and his aunt played organ at the Methodist Tabernacle. He was turned onto jazz as a 10-year-old by hearing records by Fats Waller and Bix Beiderbecke on the radio.
After leaving college Jones followed his father into banking but was called up by the Royal Navy for wartime service in the Far East. When the war ended he enrolled at Trinity College of Music in London but did not complete the course, preferring the informality of late night jazz sessions.
Jones joined the Harry Parry Sextet and Vic Lewis' Orchestra before plying his trade as ship's pianist on the luxury liner, the Queen Mary, sailing between New York and Southampton. This gave him the chance to visit New York's jazz clubs and see the likes of Coleman Hawkins and Lennie Tristano. After forming the Dill Jones Quartet in 1959, he emigrated to the United States in 1961. Settling in New York City, he became an expert in the Harlem stride style. Jones was soon in demand, and earned his reputation playing with the likes of Gene Krupa, Jimmy McPartland and Yank Lawson. Between 1969-73, Jones he was a member of the JPJ Quartet with Budd Johnson, Oliver Jackson and Bill Pemberton. Jones never forgot his homeland, and in 1978 he came back to the U.K. to perform at the inaugural Welsh Jazz Festival in Cardiff.
He died from throat cancer in a New York hospital on 22 June 1984 at the age of 60. Jet said he was "instrumental in bringing jazz to British television when he hosted the BBC Jazz Club." He was honoured later that year at the National Eisteddfod in Lampeter by being posthumously admitted to the Gorsedd of Bards, cited as "one of the leading jazz pianists in the world". The New York Times wrote in his obituary "A versatile, accomplished pianist, he was a master of the Harlem stride style of Fats Waller and a well-known interpreter of the piano music of Bix Beiderbecke".


Ultra-Lounge Vol. 15 • Wild, Cool & Swingin' Too!



From Amazon:
Like its predecessor, this CD stands out as a collection of all-vocal tracks, while other Ultra-Lounge CDs feature a few vocal songs at most and many volumes are totally instrumental. That's something all you lounge lizards out there should probably know, since most people I know definitely prefer either vocal or instrumental lounge music and that will affect how you feel about this CD. That fact aside, this is every bit as swingin' and enjoyable a collection as the first volume. The inclusion of the classic "Boy From Ipanema" alone makes this an album worth owning if you are a martini-swilling night owl. However there are many other classic tunes here as well and if vocals are your thing, this is one of the better compliations out there to throw on when you're trying to seduce someone in your shag-carpeted living room over a couple of cosmopolitans.


Shirley Scott • Girl Talk



Girl Talk is an album by American jazz organist Shirley Scott recorded in 1967 for the Impulse! label.

Sweet 60s grooves from Shirley Scott - really working the Hammond organ here with a wonderful sound - that warm, lean, soulful groove she hit perfectly at Impulse Records! There's a clarity here you don't get on some of Shirley's other records - a really stripped-down sound on the keys, which makes for playful lines that really sparkle - the kind of class and care that really set Scott apart from other 60s organists! Rhythm is nice and tight - bass from George Duvivier, and the great Mickey Roker playing some nice snapping, dancing drums - and tracks are short and compact, but still with some nice solo moments. Titles include "Come Back To Me", "On The Trail", "Love Nest", "Girl Talk", and "Keep The Faith Baby".




Nelson Carrera • Sings



Nelson Carrera nacido en Portugal (Angola, 1961), es un obrero del Rockabilly, llevando su música por casi toda Europa, siempre con el bajo perfil que lo caracteriza.




James Taylor Quartet • A Taste Of Cherry



Nigel Kennedy • Blue Note Sessions



Review by Ken Dryden
Nigel Kennedy made quite a reputation for himself as a classical violin virtuoso, though he long expressed an interest in jazz prior to the making of this CD. A number of jazz veterans, including bassist Ron Carter, drummer Jack DeJohnette, pianist Kenny Werner, and tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano (along with several others) are present and provide a stimulating group for Kennedy, who early on in the disc is comparable to Jean-Luc Ponty during the early stages of his career as a leader. But Kennedy seems a bit too conservative throughout much of the date, not taking the kind of chances one would expect of a jazz violinist during his improvisations. Another part of the problem is due to the presence of some rather pedestrian material like Butch Cornell's bland funk vehicle "Sunshine Alley" (which adds organist Lucky Peterson) and the forgettable treatment of "Expansions," featuring Raul Midón's vocal and Kennedy's bizarre use of digital delay on his instrument. Even Horace Silver's hard bop masterpiece "Song for My Father" doesn't reach his potential. Nigel Kennedy demonstrates clearly how hard it is to play jazz convincingly when it is not a major part of his regular playing schedule.


Beryl Davis - EP - Quintette du Hot Club de France & Stephane Grappelli Quartet



Beryl Davis nacida en Inglaterra en 1924 y fallecida en octubre del 2011, de familia de cantantes y músicos, comenzó cantando en la big band de su padre para las tropas en la segunda guerra mundial, Glen miller la fichó para su Army Air Force Orchestra.
Terminada la guerra se instala en Los Ángeles desarrollando su carrera con distintas bandas, artistas como Benny Goodman, Vaughn Monroe, David Rose, Mel Torme, the Gene Krupa Orchestra ..., películas y presentaciones en TV.
El post rescata 4 grabaciones efectuadas en 1939 y 1943

/////////////////////////

Beryl Davis born in England in 1924 and died in October 2011, family of singers and musicians, began singing in the big band of his father for troops in World War II, Glen Miller signed for the Army Air Force Orchestra. After the war settles in Los Angeles developing his career with various bands, artists such as Benny Goodman, Vaughn Monroe, David Rose, Mel Torme, the Gene Krupa Orchestra ..., movies and TV appearances. The post rescued four recordings made in 1939 and 1943


Udrub • Suhanas



lunes, 25 de septiembre de 2017

Howlin' Wolf • The Back Door Wolf



Herbie Mann • Surprises



VA • Bossa and More Selection



Ultra-Lounge Vol. 8 • Cocktail Capers



From Amazon:
Everyone has their favorites in the Ultra-Lounge series; this is one of mine. Unlike most of the volumes, this one doesn't stick to any one type of lounge music (Bossa Nova, Exotica, TV Themes, etc.). Instead, it is kind of an overview of ALL the styles this great series covers. So, if you'd rather start with a series entry and not the famous 'Fuzzy Sampler', this might be a good place to begin.

Highlights of Vol. 8 include: The eerie exotica of 'Jungalero' by Les Baxter, the fantastic movie theme 'Charade' (very James Bond), great spy music cuts 'Underwater Chase' and 'I Want To Be A James Bond Girl' (A song you want to sing along to, even though it hasn't any words!), a killer rendition of 'The Pink Panther Theme', and the two sultry & steamy vocal numbers 'Hey Bellboy' and 'Teach Me Tiger'. Saving the best for last, my absolute favorite 2 cuts on the disc are 'Honorable Hong Kong Rock' (what WOULD Austin Powers listen to if he were in Hong Kong?), and Nelson Riddle's astounding 'Lolita Ya-Ya' (from the film 'Lolita'). 'Ya-Ya' sounds like some demented fantasy of a bubble-gum pop song, as imagined by someone who HATES bubble-gum pop songs! Mindlessly cheerful and endlessly amazing...it's truly unique.


domingo, 24 de septiembre de 2017

Grant Green • Blue Note Retrospective



Simply put, this is a very decent four-disc collection of the work of guitarist Grant Green. It features tracks from his many albums as a leader and some as a sideman with others, such as Lee Morgan, John Patton, Baby Face Willette, and Sonny Clark. His early-’60s sides are here along with most of his defining cuts from the ’60s, from hard bop to soul-jazz to ballads to gospel — everything most fans would ever want is here, including his late blues sides recorded in the bars of Detroit in 1970. While Green’s own albums can never be replaced, this is a solid portrait of one of the most influential jazz guitarists in history.


Wild Bill Davis And His Orchestra ‎• Dansez Le Madison [EP]



Saffire - The Uppity Blues Women • Broad Casting


Muriel Roberts • Music For All Times And Seasons





Cal Tjader • Along Comes Cal



Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd • Jazz Samba



Partly because of its Brazilian collaborators and partly because of "The Girl From Ipanema," Getz/Gilberto is nearly always acknowledged as the Stan Getz bossa nova LP. But Jazz Samba is just as crucial and groundbreaking; after all, it came first, and in fact was the first full-fledged bossa nova album ever recorded by American jazz musicians. And it was just as commercially successful, topping the LP charts and producing its own pop chart hit single in "Desafinado." It was the true beginning of the bossa nova craze, and introduced several standards of the genre (including Ary Barroso's "Bahia" and Antonio Carlos Jobim's "Desafinado" and "Samba de Uma Nota Só" [aka "One Note Samba"]). But above all, Jazz Samba stands on its own artistic merit as a shimmering, graceful collection that's as subtly advanced -- in harmony and rhythm -- as it is beautiful. Getz and his co-billed partner, guitarist Charlie Byrd -- who was actually responsible for bringing bossa nova records to the U.S. and introducing Getz to the style -- have the perfect touch for bossa nova's delicate, airy texture. For his part, Byrd was one of the first American musicians to master bossa nova's difficult, bubbling syncopations, and his solos are light and lilting. Meanwhile, Getz's playing is superb, simultaneously offering a warm, full tone and a cool control of dynamics; plus, Byrd's gently off-kilter harmonies seem to stimulate Getz's melodic inventiveness even more than usual. But beyond technique, Getz intuitively understands the romanticism and the undercurrent of melancholy inherent in the music, and that's what really made Jazz Samba such a revelatory classic. Absolutely essential for any jazz collection.


Vibraphonic • Vibraphonic




Joschi Schneeberger Quintett • Rani


miércoles, 20 de septiembre de 2017

VA • The Organ



Dr. Lonnie Smith, Larry Young,  Joey DeFrancesco,  Jack McDuff,  Shirley Scott,  Baby Face Willette,  Walter Wanderley,  Bill Doggett, Jimmy Smith ...


VA • Jazz Bossa Nova



Sam Most • Flute Flight



Sam Most, one of a handful of truly great flute players, is in fine form on this quartet session with pianist Lou Levy, bassist Monty Budwig and drummer Donald Bailey. He has a classic duet with Levy on "It Might as Well Be Spring," plays beautifully on "Last Night When We Were Young," switches to clarinet for "Am I Blue," demonstrates his ability to sing along with his flute on "The Humming Blues" and really cooks during "Flying Down to Rio." A fine all-round showcase for Sam Most's underrated talents.


Floyd Cramer • That Honky Tonk Piano



Buddy Cole • Swing Fever



Nigel Kennedy • Blue Note Sessions



Review by Ken Dryden
Nigel Kennedy made quite a reputation for himself as a classical violin virtuoso, though he long expressed an interest in jazz prior to the making of this CD. A number of jazz veterans, including bassist Ron Carter, drummer Jack DeJohnette, pianist Kenny Werner, and tenor saxophonist Joe Lovano (along with several others) are present and provide a stimulating group for Kennedy, who early on in the disc is comparable to Jean-Luc Ponty during the early stages of his career as a leader. But Kennedy seems a bit too conservative throughout much of the date, not taking the kind of chances one would expect of a jazz violinist during his improvisations. Another part of the problem is due to the presence of some rather pedestrian material like Butch Cornell's bland funk vehicle "Sunshine Alley" (which adds organist Lucky Peterson) and the forgettable treatment of "Expansions," featuring Raul Midón's vocal and Kennedy's bizarre use of digital delay on his instrument. Even Horace Silver's hard bop masterpiece "Song for My Father" doesn't reach his potential. Nigel Kennedy demonstrates clearly how hard it is to play jazz convincingly when it is not a major part of his regular playing schedule.


The Glaciers • From Sea To Ski



Phil Upchurch • Upchurch



Alberto Baldan • Alberto Baldan



Is an italian musician and movie's soundtrack composer born May 15, 1948 in Milan, Italy. He's the older brother of Dario Baldan Bembo with whom he plays in various clubs of Milan in the 2nd half of the Sixties. After the early works with the Clan Celentano, realizes the music of the movie Io e Mara in 1969. Then, in 1971 becomes keyboardist in Il Dio Serpente for the music soundtrack by Augusto Martelli. The same year he cooperates with Lucio Battisti for Amore Non Amore. In 1974 he creates The Soul Of "Alì" Ben Djamballa. He works especially with Mia Martini (Donna Sola, Piccolo Uomo, Minuetto). His debut as a singer with Aria selling 25 million copies across Europe (1975).


Herbie Mann • The Inspiration I Feel



Allan Vache • High Speed Swing



Ernie Wilkins & His Orchestra • Here Comes The Swingin' Mr. Wilkins



A fine, slippery bop tenor sax player, and a creator of sharp-edged arrangements for bop and swing big bands who helped define the Count Basie Mk. II style of the 1950s, Ernie Wilkins had been a regular fixture on the American jazz scene until 1979, when he pulled up stakes and moved to Europe. He first learned piano and violin, then studied music at Wilberforce University before going into the Navy during the war. He caught on with the Earl Hines band in 1948 and worked around the St. Louis area before joining the Basie band in 1952. He remained in the Basie fold until 1955, but continued to freelance arrangements to the Count, as well as arrange for and perform with the Dizzy Gillespie band that toured the Middle East and South America in 1956. Also in 1956, he wrote three of the six movements of the exciting Wilkins/Manny Albam The Drum Suite (RCA Victor) -- reputedly the first time anyone had tried to integrate four drummers into one band -- and led big band albums under his own name for Savoy and Everest in the 1950s. He was the staff composer for the Harry James orchestra from 1958 to 1960 and served as musical director for albums by Nat Adderley, Sarah Vaughan, Buddy Rich, Oscar Peterson, and Dinah Washington, among others. In 1968, he joined Clark Terry's Big B-A-D Band, serving as a composer and music director, after which he assembled his own band and became head of A&R for the Mainstream label (1971-1973). He would continue to provide Basie with arrangements and toured Europe with Terry in the late '70s, ultimately settling in Copenhagen in 1979, where he formed the Almost Big Band. Most of the recorded examples of Wilkins' work on sax are as a sideman with Basie and Terry.


Ultra-Lounge Vol. 10 • A Bachelor In Paris



From Amazon:
Yes, this is one of the best Ultra-lounge CDs, and not just because it tries to transport you into the super-chic world of France, as viewed from the eyes of soon-to-be-too-hip-to-care Americans. Unlike many of the CDs in this set, Bachelor in Paris lands beaucoup points for actual sentiment here, even with the sometimes annoying fake French dame who pops up every now and then. The renditions of the most famous stuff ("La Vie en Rose", "April in Paris", "Milord") are pretty unique, and you can still never say that Sam Butera didn't put every ounce of his soul into his horn. My faves are the lesser known, like "French Rat Race" (Manhatten Transfer eat your hearts out!) and "Under Paris Skies/La La Collette" which may be the single corniest (yet wonderful) performance in the ultra lounge series. Overall, tout à fait beau, and so lovely on a temperate spring afternoon.