egroj world: agosto 2017

 

jueves, 31 de agosto de 2017

David Grisman & Martin Taylor • Tone Poems II



Review by Ken Dryden
David Grisman doesn't stick exclusively to mandolin on this top-notch duo date with guitarist Martin Taylor, playing mandola, mandocello, tenor guitar, and guitar as well. As on this album's predecessor, the two artists play a different vintage instrument on each track, though the music this time is much more familiar to jazz fans. The interpretations of such classics as "Swanee," "Anything Goes," "Blue Moon," and "Over the Rainbow" are consistently both stunning and fresh. The gems among the jazz compositions include Django Reinhardt's "Tears" and a tour de force arrangement of Chick Corea's "Crystal Silence." Two surprising tracks are the usually trite "Mairzy Doats" (an irritating song that was a huge hit in the '40s) and the very snappy take of the often tedious "Besame Mucho"; when musicians the caliber of Grisman and Taylor can make something out of unpromising songs like these, it demonstrates how gifted they are. Highly recommended.

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Tone Poems 2 is an album by American musicians David Grisman and Martin Taylor, released in 1995. It is Grisman's follow-up to his collaboration with guitarist Tony Rice on Tone Poems. This is a more jazz-oriented recording, on which Grisman and Taylor play on a variety of vintage fretted classic instruments (altogether they use 41 guitars, mandolins, mandolas, tenor guitars and mandocellos).   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tone_Poems_2https


miércoles, 30 de agosto de 2017

Willie Bobo ‎• Bobo's Beat


Herbie Mann • Plays The Roar of the Greasepaint & The Smell of the Crowd



Red Norvo • Mister Swing





Kenneth Norville (Beardstown, 31 de marzo de 1908 - Santa Mónica, 6 de abril de 1999), Red Norvo, vibrafonista, xilofonista y director estadounidense de jazz.
Conocido como Mr. Swing (junto con su mujer Mildred Bailey, conocida asimismo como Mrs.Swing), fue una de las grandes figuras de la época del swing tocando el xilófono; en 1943 empezó a tocar el vibráfono y, aunque no alcanzó las cotas de popularidad de otros maestros como Lionel Hampton, su presencia en el mundo del jazz fue constante tanto como músico como líder de pequeñas orquestas.
Bio completa ...

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Red Norvo (March 31, 1908 – April 6, 1999) was one of jazz's early vibraphonists, known as "Mr. Swing". He helped establish the xylophone, marimba and later the vibraphone as viable jazz instruments. His major recordings included "Dance of the Octopus", "Bughouse", "Knockin' on Wood", "Congo Blues", and "Hole in the Wall".
Bio ...




lunes, 28 de agosto de 2017

Stanley Turrentine ‎• Let It Go



Review by Stephen Cook
For fans ready to graduate from Stanley Turrentine's many fine Blue Note sets, this excellent mid-'60s date on Impulse should be the perfect option. Joined by then-wife Shirley Scott on organ, Turrentine revels in a fine array of medium cookers, three of which came from his own pen. The covers are just as impressive, including a clutch of late-night blues and ballads from the standards canon ("Time After Time") and the Ellington ("The Feeling of Jazz") and Basie catalogs ("Sent for You Yesterday"). And making it all swing in the pocket, Turrentine and Scott get top-drawer support from bassists Ron Carter and Bob Cranshaw and drummers Mack Simpkins and Otis Finch. Enjoy.


VA • Sexual Organ






Colección de más de 100 temas, que tienen como protagonista al órgano, temas clásicos, no reeditados, singles y raros la conforman. La mayoría de los mismos proviene de una web que ya no existe llamada "General Eclectic"

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Automatic Translation:
Collection of over 100 issues that have as protagonist the organ, vintage, not reprinted, singles and rare form it. Most of them comes from a website that no longer exists called "General Eclectic"


AINT THAT PECULIAR - RICHARD GROOVE HOLMES
ALAN HAWKSHAW - BEAT BOUTIQUE
ALAN HAWKSHAW - BEAT ME TIL' L'M BLUE
ALAN HAWKSHAW - DAYTRIPPER
ALAN HAWKSHAW - FUNKY STUFF
ANDRE BRASSEUR - HOLIDAY
ANDRE BRASSEUR - THE KID
ANDRE PREVIN - EXECUTIVE PARTY DANCE
ARCHIE BOLT - ONE IS ONE
BARNEY KESSELL - SOMETHING FOR CAT
BEAT GROUP - BLUESY GROUP
BEAT GROUP - HL BIRD
BEAT GROUP - SOUNDS A GO-GO
BILL DOGGET - HOLD IT
BILL DOGGETT - THE KICKER
BILLY PRESTON - BILLY'S BAG
BILLY PRESTONGREEESE
BROTHER JACK MCDUFF - 601 NORTH POPLAR
BROTHER JACK MCDUFF - GIN AND ORANGE
BROTHER JACK MCDUFF - HOT BARBECUE
BROTHER JACK MCDUFF - SCREAMIN
BROTHER JACK MCDUFF - SUMMERTIME
BROTHER JACK MCDUFF - THE HONEY DRIPPER
BROTHER JACK MCDUFF - WALK ON BY
BROTHER JACK MCDUFF - YOU SHO' WALK FUNKY
CANDIDO - TIC TAC TOE
CAPIOSSO & MECCO - THE ODD COUPLE
CARAVAN - LENNY DEE
CHARLES EARLAND - MILESTONES
CHAS EARLAND - MORE TODAY THAN YESTERDAY
CLUB 69 - CLOSE DOWN
CRISIS - THE WAILERS
D'ANGELO - CORONE ANTONIO BENTO
DAVE BABY CORTEZ - SHAKE
DAVID HOLMES - TRAPDOOR MAN
DES CHAMP - BIG M
DICK HYMAN - AGENT DOUBLE -O-S0UL
DICK HYMAN - THE LIQUIDATOR
DICK HYMAN - THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E.
DON PATTERSON - SATISFACTION
DON PATTERSON - UPTIGHT
EARL VAN DYKE - ALL FOR YOU
EDDIE 'LOCKJAW DAVIS - IN MY KITCHEN
FIRST GRAVY - LEON SPENCER
FREDDIE ROACH - ONE TRACK MIND
FREDDIE ROACH - SPACIOUS
GENE LEBELTZ - SOUL MOUNTAIN
GENE LOBLENSKY - MR. FINK
GROOVE' HOLMES - MISTY
HANK MARR - DOWN TO THE BOTTOM
HUGO MONTENEGRO - JILLY'S JOINT
ILLINOIS JACQUET - LIKE YOUNG
JACK MCDUFF - HUNK '0' FUNK
JACKIE MITTOO - GROOVY SP¡R¡T
JIMMY MCGRIFF - THE WORM
JIMMY SMITH - BURNING SPEAR
JIMMY SMITH - MISSION IMP0SSIBLE
JIMMY SMITH - THE CAT
JIMMY SMITH - WHAT'D 1 SAY
JOHN BUZON TRIO - MAMBO R0CK
JOHNNY HAMMOND SMITH - DIRTY APPLE
JOHNNY HAMMOND SMITH - GETTING UP
JOHNNY HAMMOND SMITH - HERE IT IS
KPM - GROUND H0G
KPM ALLSTARS - PIANO IN TRANS¡T
LENNY DEE - CARAVAN
LEON SPENCER - FIRST GRAVY
LOUIS CHACHERE - THE HEN
MARIAN MCPARTLAND - LOVEFOR SALE
MARTY PAICH - THE CAT
MDD - MONDO DI D0MANI
MICHEL LEGRAND - MANHATTAN STR0LL
MIKE FLOWERS POPS - THE IN CR0WD
MOHAWKS FEAT. ALAN HAWKSHAW - SEÑOR THUMP
MONDO DI DOMANI - MDD
MONK HIGGINS - WHAT F0H
OLYMPIC RUNNERS - KEEP IT UP
PIERO PICCIONI - EASY DREAMER
RAY D AVI ES' BUTTON DOWN BRASS - TEQUILA
RICHARD GROOVE HOLMES - AINT THAT PECULIAR
RICHARD 'GROOVE' HOLMES - DOWN HOME FUNK
RICHARD GROOVE HOLMES - SOUL P0WER
RODDY MCKNIGHT - EVERYTIME PT.2
ROOSEVELT'S KINGS OF RHYTHM - RED PEPPER PT.2
RUFFLE-GO MEAN
SATISFACTION - DON PATTERSON
SHAKE KEANE - MAKE LIKE SHAKE
SHIRLEY SCOTT - WALKIN'
SONNY STITT & BRO. JACK MCDUFF - N0THERFURTHER
SOUL MACHINE - TWITCHIN' F00T
SOUL TOWN - THE M0THERH00D
SOUNDS POP - DRUGPOP
STAN MINTER - TRIP ON THE STRIP
STANLEY MYERS - BARNEY
THE AWAKENING - SLINKY
THE BAR-KAYS - HOLE IN THE WALL
THE BLACK FIRE - ALCOHOL¡C
THE DELEGATES - THE PAUPER
TIMEBOX - SOUL SAUCE
TOM & JERRY - GREEN ONIONS
TONY KING SOUND - BOOGIE ON REGGAE WOMAN
TOOL - DON'T BE COOL
TRAPDOOR MAN - DAVID HOLMES
TRUDY PITTS - TAKE 5
UPTIGHT - DON PATTERSON
WALK ON BY - BROTHER JACK MCDUFF
WAR - CITY, COUNTRY, C¡TY
WILLISJACKSON - PLEASE MR JACKSON
WYNDER K. FROG - GREEN DOOR


domingo, 27 de agosto de 2017

Brother Matthew • Brother Matthew With Eddie Condon's Jazz Band



Boyce Brown was an eccentric, a rare alto saxophonist who preferred to play freewheeling Chicago jazz, an erratic individual with some outlandish opinions and, ultimately, one of the very few monks who doubled (at least briefly) as a jazz musician! He became a professional musician when he was 17, playing with drummer Don Carter's band in Chicago. Brown picked up experience working with Benny Meroff, Wingy Manone (1933), Paul Mares (1934-1935), and Johnny's Original Playboys. Brown also led his own bands and recorded with Mares, Jimmy McPartland (1939), and Wild Bill Davison (some obscure titles in 1940). Brown was based in Chicago throughout his playing career, mostly leading his own bands th
roughout the '40s and early '50s.




In the fall of 1953 he adopted the name "Brother Matthew" and entered a monastery, taking his vows in February 1956. His only date as a leader was cut in Apr. 1956 with Eddie Condon's band and, although he looks a bit strange in his somber outfit while holding a sax (one can only imagine what Wild Bill Davison thought!), Boyce Brown was in brilliant form for what would be his last recording. He died of a heart attack less than three years later.
~ Scott Yanow




info #1 ...
info #2 ...
info #3 ...

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Traducción Automática:
Boyce Brown era un excéntrico y raro saxofonista de alto que prefería interpretar el jazz de Chicago libre, un individuo errático con algunas opiniones extrañas y, en última instancia, uno de los pocos monjes que se duplicó (al menos brevemente) como músico de jazz! Él hizo un músico profesional cuando él era 17, jugando con la venda del batería Don Carter en Chicago. Brown adquirió experiencia trabajando con Benny Meroff, Wingy Manone (1933), Paul Mares (1934-1935) y Johnny's Original Playboys. Brown también dirigió sus propias bandas y grabó con Mares, Jimmy McPartland (1939), y Wild Bill Davison (algunos títulos oscuros en 1940). Brown se basó en Chicago a lo largo de su carrera como jugador, liderando principalmente sus propias bandas a lo largo de los años 40 y principios de los 50.En el otoño de 1953 adoptó el nombre de "Hermano Mateo" y entró en un monasterio, tomando sus votos en febrero de 1956. Su única fecha como líder fue cortada en abril de 1956 con la banda de Eddie Condon y, aunque se ve un poco extraño en Su sombrío traje mientras sostenía un saxo (¡sólo se puede imaginar lo que pensaba Wild Bill Davison!), Boyce Brown estaba en forma brillante por lo que sería su última grabación. Murió de un ataque al corazón menos de tres años después.~ Scott Yanow




Tracklist
A1 Linger Awhile
A2 Someday, Sweetheart
A3 My Blue Heaven
A4 Out Of Nowhere
A5 Sweet Georgia Brown
B1 Blues For Boyce
B2 The World Is Waiting For The Sunrise
B3 I Wish That I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate
B4 I Never Knew

Alto Saxophone – Brother Matthew
Conductor – Eddie Condon
Baritone Saxophone, Clarinet – Ernie Caceres
Bass – Bob Casey
Clarinet – Pew Wee Russell
Cornet – "Wild Bill" Davison
Drums – George Wettling
Guitar – Paul Smith (79) (tracks: A5, B1, B3)
Piano – Gene Schroeder
Trombone – Cutty Cutshall


jueves, 24 de agosto de 2017

Googie Rene Combo • Records



Rafael Leon "Googie" René (March 30, 1927 – November 25, 2007) was an American musician and songwriter. He was the son of famed American composer Leon René and is the father of Chris René, a singer and songwriter as well as a contestant on The X Factor USA.
Rafael obtained the nickname "Googie" because that was the first word he ever uttered as an infant.[1] By the time Googie graduated from Dorsey High School in the Los Angeles suburb of Baldwin Hills, he was showing all the signs of following in his father's footsteps.[2] He studied piano, composed songs and gained some firsthand studio experience when Leon Rene invited him along to record dates. But before Googie could get more involved, he had to serve in the US Army/Air Force in Europe. Upon his return in 1950, he found that his father's label, Exclusive Records, had gone bankrupt, but, undaunted, Leon René started to prepare a new imprint entitled Class Records.
Googie became primarily responsible for overseeing the new label, which released its first single at the end of 1951, in the short-lived 500 series. However, after the recent upheavals, Leon and Googie chose to make a quiet start and struck an arrangement with the Bihari Brothers to release the Class product on Modern and RPM. It was not until September 1956 that Class really got off the ground, with a new 200 series. The second release (Class 201) in that series was "Sad Fool" by the Rollettes (a.k.a. the Dreamers : Gloria Jones, Annette Williams and Fanita Barrett), coupled with "Wham Bam" by the Googie Rene Combo. This rocking instrumental was the start of a long line of singles (more than 20 of them, over an 11-year period) by the Combo, which usually contained the cream of the West Coast session men. The cast includes Plas Johnson and Clifford Scott on saxophone, Earl Palmer on drums, Red Callender on bass and Johnny "Guitar" Watson, Jimmy Nolen and Rene Hall on guitar. The instrumentals run the gamut from 50s rock'n'roll, boogie woogie, jump, Latin, to 60s soul-jazz. On some tracks, Googie stands out front on piano, then organ later on, while letting his cohorts take the lead on many others.
Googie was given creative control at Class, which enabled him to develop his own songwriting, arranging, keyboard playing, and production techniques. As can be clearly seen from the progression of sides presented on the Wham Bam CD, from the smooth 1956 West Coast jump of Wham Bam to the groovy 1966 Ramsey Lewis stylings, Googie had the latest chart hits and current trends always in mind when he went into the studio. The influences and inspirations are many and varied.
From a rock & roll point of view, the most interesting releases are those from the 1956-1959 period, especially "Wiggle Tail, Parts 1 & 2" (Class 221, my personal favourite, shame on UK Decca for not releasing it on London American*)," "Big Time"/"Midnight" (Class 205), "Break It Up"/"Side-Track" (Class 208) and "Rock-A Boogie"/"Beautiful Weekend" (Class 212).
Googie Rene from 'Romesville' LP (1959 - Class Records CS-LP 5003) piano - Googie René /sax - Justin Gordon, Buddy Colette, Plas Johnson, Jackie Kelso, Floyd Turnham, Jewell Grant, Willie Smith; trombone - John Ewing, Vern Friley, Lester Robertson; brass - Gerald Wilson, Conrad Gozzo, Micky Mangano, Johnny Audino, John Anderson; guitar - Howard Roberts; drums - Earl Palmer; bongo-conga - Milt Holland, Modesto Duran, Jack Costanzo; vibes-marimba - Larry Bunker; bass - Red Callender; mandolin - Al Viola, Al Hendrickson
It was probably due to the usual marketing/promotion glitches in a less-than-national operation that Googie had only three minor hits : "The Slide, Part 1" (# 20 R&B, early 1961), "Flapjacks, Part 1" (# 25 R&B, 1963) and "Smokey Joe's Lala" (# 77 pop, # 35 R&B, 1966). But as it was a family business, Class didn't turf Googie out when he failed to hit paydirt - he just kept on pushing out the singles plus three LPs.

Personal selection of themes (compiled non-commercial)
Note: The sound quality and volume is variable, since they come from different sources.

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Traducción Automática:
Rafael León "Googie" René (30 de marzo de 1927 - 25 de noviembre de 2007) fue un músico y compositor estadounidense. Fue el hijo del famoso compositor estadounidense Leon René y es padre de Chris René, cantante y compositor, así como un concursante de The X Factor USA.
Rafael obtuvo el apodo de "Googie" porque esa fue la primera palabra que pronunció cuando era niño. Cuando Googie se graduó de la Escuela Secundaria Dorsey en el suburbio de Baldwin Hills, en Los Ángeles, mostró todas las señales de seguir los pasos de su padre. Estudió piano, compuso canciones y ganó experiencia en el estudio de primera mano cuando Leon Rene lo invitó a grabar fechas. Pero antes de que Googie pudiera involucrarse más, tuvo que servir en el Ejército de los EE.UU. / Fuerza Aérea en Europa. A su regreso en 1950, encontró que el sello de su padre, Exclusive Records, había ido a la bancarrota, pero, impávido, Leon René comenzó a preparar una nueva huella titulada Class Records.
Googie se convirtió en la primera responsable de supervisar el nuevo sello, que lanzó su primer single a finales de 1951, en la serie 500 de corta duración. Sin embargo, después de las convulsiones recientes, Leon y Googie decidieron hacer un comienzo tranquilo y llegaron a un acuerdo con los hermanos Bihari para lanzar el producto Clase en Modern y RPM. No fue hasta septiembre de 1956 que Clase realmente se puso en marcha, con una nueva serie 200. El segundo lanzamiento (Clase 201) en esa serie fue "Sad Fool" de los Rollettes (a.k.a. los Soñadores: Gloria Jones, Annette Williams y Fanita Barrett), junto con "Wham Bam" por el Googie Rene Combo. Este rock instrumental fue el comienzo de una larga línea de singles (más de 20 de ellos, durante un período de 11 años) por el Combo, que por lo general contenía la crema de los hombres de la sesión de la Costa Oeste. El elenco incluye Plas Johnson y Clifford Scott en el saxofón, Earl Palmer en la batería, Red Callender en el bajo y Johnny "Guitar" Watson, Jimmy Nolen y Rene Hall en la guitarra. Los instrumentales van desde el rock de los años 50, el boogie woogie, el salto, el latín, hasta el soul-jazz de los años 60. En algunas pistas, Googie se destaca por delante en el piano, luego en el órgano más adelante, al tiempo que deja que sus compañeros tomen la delantera en muchos otros.
Googie recibió un control creativo en Class, lo que le permitió desarrollar sus propias composiciones, arreglos, teclados y técnicas de producción. Como puede verse claramente en la progresión de los lados presentados en el Wham Bam CD, desde el suave salto de 1956 de la Costa Oeste de Wham Bam hasta los groovy 1966 estilos de Ramsey Lewis, Googie tuvo los últimos éxitos de la lista y las tendencias actuales siempre en mente cuando fue En el estudio. Las influencias y las inspiraciones son muchas y variadas.
Desde el punto de vista del rock & roll, los lanzamientos más interesantes son los del período 1956-1959, especialmente "Wiggle Tail, Parts 1 & 2" (Clase 221, mi favorita personal, la vergüenza en UK Decca por no lanzarla en Londres "Big Time" / "Midnight" (Clase 205), "Break It Up" / "Side-Track" (Clase 208) y "Rock-A Boogie" / "Beautiful Weekend" (Clase 212).
Googie Rene de 'Romesville' LP (1959 - Discos de Clase CS-LP 5003) piano - Googie René / saxo - Justin Gordon, Buddy Colette, Plas Johnson, Jackie Kelso, Floyd Turnham, Jewell Grant, Willie Smith; Trombón - John Ewing, Vern Friley, Lester Robertson; Latón - Gerald Wilson, Conrado Gozzo, Micky Mangano, Johnny Audino, John Anderson; Guitarra - Howard Roberts; Tambores - Earl Palmer; Bongo-conga - Milt Holanda, Modesto Durán, Jack Costanzo; Vibes-marimba - Larry Bunker; Bajo - Red Callender; Mandolina - Al Viola, Al Hendrickson
Probablemente debido a los fallos habituales de marketing / promoción en una operación menos que nacional, Googie tuvo sólo tres éxitos menores: "The Slide, Part 1" (# 20 R & B, principios de 1961), "Flapjacks, Part 1" # 25 R & B, 1963) y "Smokey Joe's Lala" (# 77 pop, # 35 R & B, 1966). Pero como se trataba de un negocio familiar, la Clase no soltó a Googie cuando no logró golpear a paydirt - solo siguió empujando a los singles más tres LPs.

Selección personal de temas (compilado no comercial)
Nota: La calidad y volumen de sonido es variable, ya que provienen de distintas fuentes.








miércoles, 23 de agosto de 2017

Ceasar Frazier • Hail Caesar!





Review:
Hail Ceasar! is the first album to feature organist Ceasar Frazier as a leader and it is very much a monster bit of funky jazz. The LP consists of a number of long tracks that all jam mightily, right up there with the best of the Soul Jazz grooves coming out of the early seventies. The album was released on the rare Eastbound label a jazz subsidiary of Westbound Records. It's overall success is contributed to highly by the recording maestro Rudy van Gelder. Ceasar pulls together a Prestige-styled combo with a group of players well-known and recorded by van Gelder. It includes Houston Person on soulful sax, Cecil Bridgewater blowing away on Trumpet, Melvin Sparks throwing in some heavy licks, Gordon Edwards ramping up the bass, Idris Muhammad smashing away on drums and Buddy Caldwell doing his bit on the congas. As a first this album truly showcases Ceasar grooving hard on the organ and the chosen tracks don't disappoint. Well recommended!


Terry Gibbs • El Latino



Wynton Kelly Trio & Wes Montgomery • Smokin' In Seattle-Live At The Penthouse




sábado, 19 de agosto de 2017

Dick Farney • Trio



Dick Farney (birthname Farnésio Dutra e Silva: born November 14, 1921; died August 4, 1987) was a Brazilian pianist, pop-composer, and "crooner" popular in the 1950s.
Dick Farney, stage name of Farnesio Dutra e Silva (Rio de Janeiro, November 14, 1921 - August 4, 1987) was a Brazilian pianist, pop-composer, and "crooner" very popular in Brazil in the late 1940s until the 1970s. He began playing piano as a child when he learned classical music with his father while his mother taught him singing. In 1937 he debuted as a singer in "Hora Juvenil radio program at Radio Cruzeiro do Sul in Rio de Janeiro, when he performed the song Deep Purple composed by David Rose, was taken by César Ladeira to Radio Mayrink Veiga, going to present the program "Dick Farney, the Voice and Piano". He formed the group "Os Swing Maniacos", alongside with his brother Cyll Farney, on drums, and accompanied Edu da Gaita Song on recording of "Indian Song" by the Russian composer Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908). From 1941 to 1944, was the crooner with the orchestra of Carlos Machado, at the Casino da Urca, at the time when gambling was still allowed in Brazil. In 1946 he was invited to go to the United States after meeting arranger Bill Hitchcock and pianist Eddie Duchin at the Copacabana Palace Hotel. Between 1947 and 1948 appeared on many radio programs on NBC, especially as regular singer at the "Milton Berle Show". In 1948 he appeared with success in the nightclub Vogue, in Rio de Janeiro. In 1959 he had his own TV program "Dick Farney Show", aired by TV Record - Channel 7 in São Paulo. In 1960 formed the group "Dick Farney and His Orchestra" and played in many balls. In 1965 he had the "Dick and Betty Show" at the newly opened TV Globo - Channel 4, Rio de Janeiro, presented by himself and Betty Faria. He was owner of the nightclubs "Farney's" and "Farney's Inn", both in São Paulo. Formed a trio with Sabá on 1971. From 1973 to 1978 he played piano and sang at the nightclub "Chez Régine" in Rio


viernes, 18 de agosto de 2017

Grant Green • Idle Moments



Review by Steve Huey
This languid, seductive gem may well be Grant Green's greatest moment on record. Right from the opening bars of the classic title cut, Idle Moments is immediately ingratiating and accessible, featuring some of Green's most stylish straight jazz playing. Whether he's running warm (pianist Duke Pearson's "Idle Moments"), cool (the Modern Jazz Quartet's "Django"), or a bit more up-tempo (Pearson's "Nomad," his own "Jean de Fleur"), Green treats the material with the graceful elegance that was the hallmark of his best hard bop sessions, and that quality achieves its fullest expression here. He's helped by an ensemble that, as a sextet, is slightly larger and fuller-sounding than usual, and there's plenty of room for solo explorations on the four extended pieces. Pearson's touch on the piano is typically warm, while two players best known on Blue Note for their modernist dates mellow out a bit -- the cool shimmer of Bobby Hutcherson's vibes is a marvelously effective addition to the atmosphere, while Joe Henderson plays with a husky, almost Ike Quebec-like breathiness. That cushion of support helps spur Green to some of the loveliest, most intimate performances of his career -- no matter what the tempo, it's as if his guitar is whispering secrets in your ear. It's especially true on the dreamy title track, though: a gorgeous, caressing, near-15-minute excursion that drifts softly along like a warm, starry summer night. Even more than the two-disc set The Complete Quartets With Sonny Clark, Idle Moments is the essential first Green purchase, and some of the finest guitar jazz of the hard bop era.




miércoles, 16 de agosto de 2017

King Curtis • King Of The Sax



Review by Steve Leggett
King Curtis and his bubbling, stutter-style tenor sax playing brought a touch of jazz and a whole ton of R&B to countless rock & roll tracks in the early '60s, and his funky edge is one of the reasons records by the Coasters, for instance, continue to sound good 40 years later. This collection brings together a nice set of solo Curtis singles, kicking off with his first hit, "Soul Twist," and its B-side, "Twisting Time," which came out on Enjoy Records in 1962. Curtis was a more versatile musician than many people realize (he did sessions with artists as varied as Lonnie Donegan and Andy Williams, and shows it here by going sans sax, playing a solid electric guitar and handling the vocals on a two-part version of the Ray Charles classic "What'd I Say." Curtis shows himself right at home in Memphis soul territory, too, with the Booker T. & the MG's-styled "Hot Potato (Piping Hot)." The haunting and slightly ominous instrumental "Midnight Blue" is another highlight included here, although one wishes room could have been found for one of Curtis' best tunes, "Soul Serenade," which featured Curtis on saxello. That omission aside, King of the Sax makes for a fine introduction to this extraordinary musician.


lunes, 14 de agosto de 2017

Moe Koffman • The Shepherd Swings Again



Canadian flutist Moe Koffman was delighted to have a hit on his hands after the success of his "The Swingin' Shepherd Blues," so this Jubilee LP became his immediate follow-up album. Joined by guitarist Ed Bickert, bassist Hugh Currie and drummer Ron Rully, Koffman wrote five new originals for this record, including the light and breezy "Flute Salad" and the hip swinger "Marty's Morgue." He also adds an easygoing take of Sonny Rollins' "Doxy," and a hard bop (with traces of funk in its introduction) arrangement of the standard "Alone Together." Koffman switches to alto sax for his intricate "Bermuda Schwartz" (which features a fine solo by Bickert and a few drum breaks), as well as on Rully's exotic composition "What Can You Do ?" Long out of print, consider this LP to be extremely rare.
Ken Dryden


Magic Sam • Black Magic



 




Utamaro • Edmond de Goncourt, inglés


Kitagawa Utamaro (h. 1753 - 1806) (su nombre se transliteró igualmente como Outamaro y Utamaru) era un pintor de estampas japonés, considerado uno de los mejores artistas de los grabados ukiyo-e. Se le conoce especialmente por sus magistrales composiciones de mujeres, conocidas como bijinga. También hizo estudios de la naturaleza, en particular libros ilustrados de insectos.

 Su obra llegó a Europa a mediados del siglo XIX, donde se hizo muy popular, disfrutando de especial aceptación en Francia. Influyó a los impresionistas europeos, particularmente por su uso de vistas parciales, con énfasis en la luz y la sombra. Fuente: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utamaro
pdf / inglés / 256 págs. / 71MB

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Kitagawa Utamaro (1753 – 31 October 1806) was a Japanese artist. He is one of the most highly regarded designers of ukiyo-e woodblock prints and paintings, and is best known for his bijin ōkubi-e "large-headed pictures of beautiful women" of the 1790s. He also produced nature studies, particularly illustrated books of insects.
Little is known of Utamaro's life. His work began to appear in the 1770s, and he rose to prominence in the early 1790s with his portraits of beauties with exaggerated, elongated features. He produced over 2000 known prints and was one of the few ukiyo-e artists to achieve fame throughout Japan in his lifetime. In 1804 he was arrested and manacled for fifty days for making illegal prints depicting the 16th-century military ruler Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and died two years later.
Utamaro's work reached Europe in the mid-nineteenth century, where it was very popular, enjoying particular acclaim in France. He influenced the European Impressionists, particularly with his use of partial views and his emphasis on light and shade, which they imitated. The reference to the "Japanese influence" among these artists often refers to the work of Utamaro. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utamaro

Pdf / English / 256 pp. / 71MB










viernes, 11 de agosto de 2017

VA • Hammond Heroes - 60's R&B Organ Grooves



Review by Steve Leggett:
There is actually as much jazz and rock & roll as R&B on this intriguing and generous (it comes in with a running time of just under 80 minutes) disc from Bear Family, which features instrumentals from almost two dozen Hammond B3 players popular in Britain in the 1960s. Among the highlights of Hammond Heroes: 60's R&B Heroes are Steve Winwood's "Stevie's Groove," recorded in 1966 when he was still a member of the Spencer Davis Group; the fiery "Zoom Widge and Way" from drummer Bobby Graham with Kenny Salmon on organ; a hard-charging and jazz-inflected version of the gospel classic "Wade in the Water" with Graham Bond at the keys and a rhythm section of Jack Bruce on bass and Ginger Baker on drums from 1965, and the Nice's rendition of Charles Lloyd's "Sombrero Sam," featuring Keith Emerson on organ, from 1968. Also worth noting is the massive, swelling "Back in the Grass" recorded by the group Motherhood in 1968, and featuring Klaus Doldinger on tenor sax and James "Ham" Jackson on organ. The liner notes for this set are top-notch, beginning with a brief history of Laurens Hammond, the man who invented the Hammond organ (he also invented those familiar red and green 3-D glasses, by the way), and once he added Don Leslie's rotating speaker system to the organ frame, a stone cold classic instrument came to life. What we need now is for Bear Family to do a companion volume of American Hammond players like Jimmy Smith, Jack McDuff, and Jimmy McGriff.


 



Johnny 'Hammond' Smith • Wild Horses Rock Steady



Review by Thom Jurek
Johnny Hammond's 1972 soul-jazz beauty is another stunning example of great creativity at Creed Taylor's Kudu label through the mid-'70s. Arranged by Bob James, Hammond's trademark B-3 work is showcased here on six extended cover versions of tunes from the pop vernacular. The lineup includes guitarists George Benson, Eric Gale, and Melvin Sparks, saxophonists Grover Washington, Jr. and Pepper Adams, bassist Ron Carter (playing electric as well as double bass), and drummers Bernard Purdie and Billy Cobham!
There are grooves galore in this wondrously mixed set, from the smoking guitar breaks in the read of Aretha Franklin's "Rock Steady" to the syncopated organ pyrotechnics in "It's Impossible," with Washington playing his ass off around Hammond's organ breaks, and the beautiful horn arrangements by James in "Peace Train." The funky-butt glimmer in "I Don't Know How to Love Him" could have been played by the Stax/Volt horns with a Funk Brothers rhythm section. James weaves a string section in harmonic counterpoint to Hammond's organ in the melody, creating a moving tapestry of textures against the backbeat. But nothing can prepare the listener for the closing cover of Jagger and Richard's "Wild Horses," with a military snare beat providing an unlikely intro to an "All Along the Watchtower"-like progression that transforms itself seamlessly into a darkly minor reading of the original melody, with beautiful fills by Benson and Sparks. When the horns kick in during the refrain with plenty of fuzz guitar and bass over the top, the listener falls headlong into the magic of dirty groove and roll.




Big Jay McNeely • Blues & Rhythm Series Classics (1948 - 1950)



Cecil James McNeely (Los Angeles, Estados Unidos, 29 de abril de 1927), más conocido como Big Jay McNeely,1 es un saxofonista tenor de rock 'n' roll, también conocido como el Rey del Honkin' Tenor Sax (honk viene a significar bocina o bocinazo).
Inspirado por hombres como Lester Young, Illinois Jacquet o Coleman Hawkins, empezó a tocar con su hermano mayor, Robert McNeely (que tocaba el saxo barítono). En sus primeras grabaciones, estuvo acompañado por el batería Johnny Otis, participando en "Barrel House Stomp". Al poco tiempo, Savoy Records firmó con Big Jay un contrato de grabación. El jefe de la discográfica, Herman Lubinsky, sugirió el nombre artístico de Big Jay McNeely.
Bio completa


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Cecil James McNeely (born April 29, 1927, Watts, Los Angeles, California),[1] known as Big Jay McNeely, is an American rhythm and blues saxophonist.
Inspired by Illinois Jacquet and Lester Young, he teamed with his older brother Robert McNeely, who played baritone saxophone, and made his first recordings with drummer Johnny Otis, who ran the Barrelhouse Club that stood only a few blocks from McNeely's home.[1] Shortly after he performed on Otis's "Barrel House Stomp." Ralph Bass, A&R man for Savoy Records, promptly signed him to a recording contract. Bass's boss, Herman Lubinsky, suggested the stage name Big Jay McNeely because Cecil McNeely did not sound commercial. McNeely's first hit was "The Deacon's Hop," an instrumental which topped the Billboard R&B chart in early 1949.
Bio