PW: egroj

viernes, 9 de diciembre de 2016

Brother Jack Mcduff • A change is gonna come



Review by Bruce Eder
This album is an elegant mix of soul and sambas, interspersed with a pair of distinctly blues-focused pieces. Jack McDuff's Hammond B-3 organ surges and trills and rocks, at times seeming to talk as the lead instrument on renditions of works as different as Ray Charles' "What'd I Say" and Sam Cooke's "A Change Is Gonna Come." His calls and responses with the five-man brass section on several of the tracks here comprise another highlight, but even the slow numbers, such as "No Tears," offer virtuoso playing by McDuff. The tempo and texture shifts throughout keep this record continually interesting to the listener, and the range of influences, from jazz to gospel with side trips into the blues (culminating with a seven-minute epic in the latter genre), gives a lot of great playing for everybody.


Biography :
A marvelous bandleader and organist as well as capable arranger, "Brother" Jack McDuff has one of the funkiest, most soulful styles of all time on the Hammond B-3. His rock-solid basslines and blues-drenched solos are balanced by clever, almost pianistic melodies and interesting progressions and phrases. McDuff began as a bassist playing with Denny Zeitlin and Joe Farrell. He studied privately in Cincinnati and worked with Johnny Griffin in Chicago. He taught himself organ and piano in the mid-'50s, and began gaining attention working with Willis Jackson in the late '50s and early '60s, cutting high caliber soul-jazz dates for Prestige. McDuff made his recording debut as a leader for Prestige in 1960, playing in a studio pickup band with Jimmy Forrest. They made a pair of outstanding albums: Tough Duff and The Honeydripper. McDuff organized his own band the next year, featuring Harold Vick and drummer Joe Dukes. Things took off when McDuff hired a young guitarist named George Benson. They were among the most popular combos of the mid-'60s and made several excellent albums. McDuff's later groups at Atlantic and Cadet didn't equal the level of the Benson band, while later dates for Verve and Cadet were uneven, though generally good. McDuff experimented with electronic keyboards and fusion during the '70s, then in the '80s got back in the groove with the Muse session Cap'n Jack. While his health fluctuated throughout the '90s, McDuff released several discs on the Concord Jazz label before succumbing to heart failure on January 23, 2001, at the age of 74. ~ Ron Wynn and Bob Porter


Tracklist:
01 - Down In The Valley
02 - A Change Is Gonna Come
03 - Hotcha
04 - What'd I Say
05 - No Tears
06 - Gonna Hang Me Up A Sign
07 - Minha Saudade
08 - Same Old, Same Old
09 - Can't Find The Keyhole Blues

Jack McDuff - organ
Johnny Grimes, Harold Johnson - trumpets
Richard Harris - trombones
Danny Turner - alto saxophones
Arthur Clarke, George Coleman - tenor saxophones
Buddy Lucas - baritone saxophone
James Oliver - guitar
Cornell Dupree - guitar, congas
Jimmy Tyrell - bass
Joe Dukes, Bernard Purdie - drums
Warren Smith - percussion



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